The Water Value Revolution? The Chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Tops Key-Note Speaker Line-up for The Global Water Summit 2015


(PRWEB) December 18, 2014

The Global Water Summit for 2015 will be held in Athens on 27th and 28th April 2015 at The InterContinental Hotel Athenaeum, Athens. Hosted by Global Water Intelligence and the International Desalination Association, the Summit is a leading business event for water leaders throughout the world.

The Global Water Summit 2015 will push forward with the ambition to strengthen the growing link between water and economic development through a range progressive and stimulating sessions. Formats include inspirational plenary talks, dedicated networking round-tables and pre-arranged one-to-one meetings, break-out sessions and workshops. The purpose of high level events like the Global Water Summit, which bring together all the key players in an industry, is to accelerate change and to facilitate powerful networking opportunities. Attendees will include over 500 Ministers and top executives from government departments, public and private water companies, suppliers, financiers and investors.

Top speakers will be drawn from major-water using industries (food and beverage, mining, oil and gas) as well as public and private sector utilities. Major speakers confirmed so far:

Keynote speaker, Dr Rajendra Pachauri, is the Chair of the Nobel Peace Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Director General of TERI (The Energy and Resources Institute) and a prominent researcher on environmental issues. Internationally recognised for his efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change his insights are invaluable in the ambition to determine water’s key role in the future of sustainable economic growth.

Dr Rajendra Pachauri will be joined by Dame Ellen MacArthur who made yachting history in 2005, when she became the fastest solo sailor to circumnavigate the globe. Having become acutely aware of the finite nature of the resources our linear economy relies upon, she stepped away from professional sailing to launch the Ellen MacArthur Foundation in 2010, which works with education and business to accelerate the transition to a regenerative circular economy.

The Global Water Summit will also feature the coveted Global Water Awards, acknowledging the most important achievements in the international water industry. Nominations are now open to all and close on 31st January.

The categories for the awards will include:

Project Insight – Road and Rail Projects in the Middle East and Africa Reports Cue


(PRWEB UK) 13 January 2015

This Project Insight report details the road and railways market in the Middle East and Africa. It features an analysis of almost 400 large-scale projects tracked by Timetrics Construction Intelligence Center (CIC) as of October 2014. The projects have been consolidated into four defined sectors: highways and roads, railways, trams and metros, and mixed projects that include associated bridges and tunnels projects. The countries covered comprise the major markets in the Middle East and Africa: Algeria, Iraq, Israel, Kuwait, Nigeria, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Africa and the UAE. Summary analysis is also provided for other major markets, including Botswana, Tunisia, Kenya, Tanzania, Egypt, Mozambique, Ghana, C

Stephen Gunzenhauser & Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra – Die Ruinen von Athen (The Ruins of Athens), Op. 113: Overture


Stephen Gunzenhauser & Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra – Die Ruinen von Athen (The Ruins of Athens), Op. 113: Overture

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Friday, March 12, 2010

Last Athens Farmers Market 2009

I am not a lover of lawns. Rather would I see daisies in their thousands, ground ivy, hawkweed, and even the hated plantain with tall stems, and dandelions with splendid flowers and fairy down, than the too-well-tended lawn.--William Henry Hudson

video

Thanks to all the members and patrons of the Athens Farmers Market in Athens, Georgia for a tremendous year. The 2010 season, no doubt, will be twice as good.

See you soon.

P.S. New content will be intermittent here, as Farmer South is now live.

Thursday, March 04, 2010

Ode to Summer: We're Waiting

When I go into the garden with a spade, and dig a bed, I feel such an exhilaration and health that I discover that I have been defrauding myself all this time in letting others do for me what I should have done with my own hands. -- Ralph Waldo Emerson


Please. I'm ready for this to be done.
Oh baby, it's been a long, long time since that evening sun's come round....

You know the one I'm talking about, that later-day summer sun in the South, when the cicadas are out, yet the temperature is almost perfect. You hop in the truck to go for a ride, waving your hand out the window, riding it on the waves of air. The world smells like a stream. The sun goes down, and you walk through its afterglow, the shimmery gloaming celebrated in lightning bugs.

Lord, the warm weather can't some soon enough. I can see the table set with my mother's Pfaltzgraff tableware--cool blue Yorktowne pattern to be specific. There it is, regimented in sparkling flatware, in angles of forks and knifes burning with potential energy (more about silverware at Silverware Wikipedia, in case anyone doubted its incendiary capability).

Now the dinner plates crisscross around its length: cornbread and biscuits. Thick gray gravy, milk and sausage grease. Lima beans soaking in butter. Stewed greens. Sliced pink pounds of ham. Corn on the cob. One piece of dinnerware, for one fat tomato, cut in chunks and salted. Another for rings of a sweet yellow onion.

In the fridge a key lime pie, waiting.

And the sunlight reaching through the window.

Tuesday, November 03, 2009

Who's Your Farmer?

Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?--Douglas Adams

One of the vital purposes of this blog (when I'm not neglecting it) is the sharing of information. If that hardly sounds like a revolutionary mission statement, it's not. In fact, there may be nothing more obvious or downright pedestrian. Every published word, no matter where it appears, is an atom of information. And most blogs, in their essence, seek nothing more than to make communal the salient elements of private experience.

On the other hand, when the subject is agriculture and making food fit to eat, the importance of shared information rises to a critical level. Simply, we are growing generations without any intimacy with the soil and  a cooking education that goes beyond frozen pizza in a conventional oven. As long as we continue to have, say, potatoes, I have faith we can overcome the latter: After all, even I know how to cook now, when only a few years ago I was sauteing canned salmon and mayonnaise in olive oil. But I wonder sometimes how long we'll have potatoes, especially ones not drenched in pesticides?

It's not an outrageous example. According to Progressive Farmer, from 2002 to 2007, the number of people "under twenty five years old who call farming their prime occupation fell by almost half," with fewer than 6,000 across the nation ("The Young Faces of Ag, October 2009). The average farmers in 2007 was over 57 years old. This upward trend in age certainly suggests that our agricultural knowledge is in peril. For a variety of reasons, we're missing the next farmers in line to learn when to plant the seed and how to use a tractor.

Perhaps the issue is even more urgent in organic production because its practice is more complicated and information-heavy than conventional agriculture. It's the difference between crop rotation and companion planting, or simply spraying a pesticide. In the past decade we have seen educational opportunities in the organic field spring up in academic certificate programs and mentoring support offered by non-profits. But the body of knowledge--and its institutionalization--is still being formed. As we grow the community, the best way to promulgate the why's and how-to's of organic farming is personal, firsthand experience and sharing it.


The enemy.

I will continue to share what I learned, e.g. don't ever, ever, ever let stink bugs in your tomato patch. I also encourage anyone really interested in farming organic to find immersion, to live and breathe the idea. The good news is there are an abundance of farm internships out there (and farmers in desperate need of labor). One way to get started might be to volunteer on organic farms by signing up with WWOOF, or World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms, which connects organic farms in different countries with temporary volunteer help and enables those volunteers to see the world (Flights to Tel Aviv, anyone?). In a sensible and earthy way, it brings closer to home a global environmental consciousness.

Actually, I knew a couple in Arkansas who had been Wwoofers in Ireland. While they like anyone else traveling abroad or to the U.S. were responsible for taking care of their visas, they were matched to their work opportunities and lodging through the Wwoof organization. Unmistakably, they had a blast.

Wednesday, July 29, 2009

Great Tomato Sauce Recipes

The man's desire is for the woman but the woman's desire is rarely other than for the desire of the man. -- Samuel Taylor Coleridge



Who's got recipes? With all these damn scrumptious tomatoes, I need 'em. Here's the very serviceable one I've been using from allrecipes.com:
* 10 ripe tomatoes
* 2 tablespoons olive oil
* 2 tablespoons butter
* 1 onion, chopped
* 1 green bell pepper, chopped
* 2 carrots, chopped
* 4 cloves garlic, minced
* 1/4 cup chopped fresh basil
* 1/4 teaspoon Italian seasoning
* 1/4 cup Burgundy wine
* 1 bay leaf
* 2 stalks celery
* 2 tablespoons tomato paste

DIRECTIONS

1. Bring a pot of water to a boil. Have ready a large bowl of iced water. Plunge whole tomatoes in boiling water until skin starts to peel, 1 minute. Remove with slotted spoon and place in ice bath. Let rest until cool enough to handle, then remove peel and squeeze out seeds. Chop 8 tomatoes and puree in blender or food processor. Chop remaining two tomatoes and set aside.
2. In a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat, cook onion, bell pepper, carrot and garlic in oil and butter until onion starts to soften, 5 minutes. Pour in pureed tomatoes. Stir in chopped tomato, basil, Italian seasoning and wine. Place bay leaf and whole celery stalks in pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low, cover and simmer 2 hours. Stir in tomato paste and simmer an additional 2 hours. Discard bay leaf and celery and serve.
I've yet to include either celery or tomato paste in my trials. You need salt, particularly if your butter is unsalted. I used a fruity South Georgia wine, nice to cook with and nice to sip (the Hahira Red from Horse Creek Winery)--although it's not absolutely essential. I've also doubled the carrot and increased the tomato requirements by half, based on the superabundance of tomatoes and carrots on hand. Mushrooms are a good throw-in as well.

I'm ready for variations and new culinary adventures. Any suggestions? Anything with zucchini (I've got some ugly ones probably unfit for market)? Bring it on.

Thursday, July 09, 2009

There's This Dream I Keep Having...


Not that I want to be a god or a hero. Just to change into a tree, grow for ages, not hurt anyone -- Czeslaw Milosz

...I get up in the morning and head down to the field, and all the tomatoes are dead. Sometimes it's some lurid, overnight disease that's taken hold. Sometimes they've been decimated by deer or groundhogs or stupid, bastard kids who've tramped through the woods swinging baseball bats. When I stand there and see all the dead plants, I laugh. I can't do anything. Six months of hard thought and physical labor, every night of motherly worrying and hoping, are gone.

It's silly, but these tomatoes have consumed my life--and I have no idea exactly what I'm going to do with them. I'm sorry for being away, and I appreciate everyone who's stopped by, checking in during my absence. I'll do my best to honor your faith and repay your kindness.

Here's another picture for the ladies (thanks for the tip, Amber). I've got cuter ones coming.

Friday, May 22, 2009

Out with the Old

And he said, "Naked I came from my mother's womb, and naked shall I return; the Lord gave, and the Lord has taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord" -- Job 1:21


In with the new. I want to put up some pictures of something cute to counteract the grim portrait of Juanita in a previous post. There's also a point to make here. Was I sad about Juanita's death? Sure. Maybe the better word is "disappointed"--frustrated that all my hard work had been so quickly and summarily snuffed out. But nothing more.

There's no time for sentimentality and weeping on the farm. Quite simply. there's too much to do. And I know well the bloody awfulness of Nature. I borrow from it what I can, and I'm not so vain as to presume to have any control.

Lastly, if daily existence on a farm can often seem like a gruesome circus, it also has a warm, exhilirating antipode.

Juanita's gone. But now this orphan calf needs some looking after. Maybe there are no fair trades in life and death, but this one is acceptable.

Monday, May 18, 2009

Juanita Is Dead

 Long live Juanita!

More to come.

Monday, May 11, 2009

What Now: Part 2

A lawn is nature under totalitarian rule -- Michael Pollan

Here's what:


Yum. Thank you, Juanita!

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